Monthly Archives: January 2016

Grants awarded in December 2015 (over £10k)

Dr R Gupta, £15,000, Royal Society of Chemistry, Smart dressings: A step change in wound management

Dr G Paterson, £10,000, Society for Applied Microbiology, Investigating the emergence and epidemiology of mecC MRSA in Great Britain

Dr J A Strong, Mr S Barnard, Mrs S J Boyes, Prof M Elliott, Dr A Franco, £47,750, United Kingdom Offshore Oil and Gas Industry Association, Development of seabed survey strategies for the UK continental shelf oil and gas industry

Prof S K Haywood, £34,598, Keresa Plantations Sdn Bhd, Process route analysis for Keresa Mill

Prof J Greenman, Dr V Green, Dr C Cawthorne, £193,197 (full grant value £496,000), Innovate UK, Development of a multipurpose non-animal technology for pre-clinical radiotherapy studies

Grants awarded in November 2015 (over £10k)

Miss K L Hemingway, Mr N D Cutts, Prof M Elliott, £10,000, Environment Agency, Assessment of Saltmarsh Development in the Alkborough MR Site for WFD Compliance

Prof L Ingle, £16,532, City Health Care Partnership CIC, Research Assistant in Exercise

Dr M Hird, £51,385, EPSRC, The British Liquid Crystal Society Annual Training Workshop

Dr B Hänfling, Dr L Lawson Handley, £55,829, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, The Development of an eDNA-Based Approach for Fish Sampling in Lochs for WFD – Phase 2

Can trees really cool our cities down?

WanderingtheWorld (www.ChrisFord.com)/Flickr, CC BY-NC

Editor’s note: This article was originally published on The Conversation.

By Roland Ennos, Professor of Biomechanics

In cities around the world, trees are often planted to help control temperatures and mitigate the effects of the “urban heat island”. But while trees have been called “nature’s air conditioners”, in practice, scientists often have difficulty demonstrating their cooling properties.

The most obvious way to measure the cooling effect of trees would be to compare the air temperature in parks with that in nearby streets. But this method often comes up with disappointing results: even in large, leafy parks, the daytime air temperature is usually less than 1°C cooler than in the stuffy streets, and at night the temperature in parks can actually be higher.

To explain this contradiction, we need to think more clearly about the physics of heat flows in our cities, and the scale of the measurements we are taking. Read more

University of Hull offers clusters of science and engineering PhD Scholarships

University of Hull sign

We are pleased to announce 15 science and engineering full PhD Scholarships for 2016 entry.

The University of Hull are offering over 40 Scholarships in total to UK, EU and international students, as part of its ongoing commitment to research.

The PhD Scholarships will be combined with investments in Post-Doctoral positions to build robust expertise in key research cluster areas. Each of the PhD projects are distinct and many are interdisciplinary or in collaboration with industry.

The Scholarships cover full fees for UK, EU and international students. UK and EU students also receive a tax-free maintenance stipend that is in line with Research Councils UK Doctoral Training Centre levels. The closing date for applications is 29 February 2016.

Professor Dan Parsons, Associate Dean for Research and Enterprise in the Faculty of Science and Engineering, said: “We are delighted to announce these PhD Scholarship opportunities and to  build a robust research environment around these important clusters of research. We look forward to many applications for these excellent projects.”

PhD Scholarships

The Scholarships offered within the Faculty of Science and Engineering are available in the following five research clusters:

Gender, Place and Memory, 1400-1900

These PhD projects form part of the Gender, Place and Memory 1400-1900 research cluster at the University of Hull which draws in academics and researchers from History, English and Geography:

Women walking the world: emotions, place and memory in English court records, 1400-1800

Women, property and the law: mapping sexual inequality in the East Riding of Yorkshire, 1708-1974

3D Printing of Bio-inspired Composites as a Cross-Cutting Capability

We are investing significant resources in creating a 3D printing research cluster which combines the expertise of chemists, engineers and physicists to create novel materials through rational design.

3D printing of functionally graded complex composites

3D printing: Bio-inspired self-healing composite materials

Catastrophic Flows

Catastrophic flows have shaped and reshaped our physical environment, and the humans that reside on them since the planet was first formed. The lessons we glean from these epic events in the past have the power to change the way we predict and survive future occurrences.

Scaling flood events and ecohydraulics in experimental models

Coastal system resilience under increased storminess

Simulating catastrophic flows on Mars

Quantifying the sedimentation of ignimbrites: understanding the behaviour of pyroclastic density currents through experimental modelling

Origins: From the Sub-Atomic to Clusters of Galaxies

We are pleased to announce four new PhD studentships within the University’s E.A. Milne Centre for Astrophysics, spanning the sub-atomic to the largest scales in the Universe.

Nucleosynthetic yields and artificial stars

The cosmic distance ladder

Star formation in cluster galaxies

Extreme solar flares

Directed Self Assembly

These PhD positions are part of a major research initiative from the University of Hull to create a directed self-assembly cluster combining the expertise of chemists and physicists to create novel materials.

Directed self-assembly for metamaterials: physics and devices: geometries for nanophotonic applications

Directed self-assembly for metamaterials: physics and devices: optical and electrical properties of self-assembled metamaterials

Novel chiroptical organic/metal nano systems

 

For more information about the University of Hull Scholarships 2016, and to apply, visit www.hull.ac.uk/phd

New brochure showcases world-leading science and engineering research

A new brochure from the University of Hull offers an insight into the pioneering research undertaken by staff and postgraduate research students across its Faculty of Science and Engineering.

Research in Focus 2016 showcases the work of a range of leading-edge researchers and its real life impact.

Following interest in the first publication of this type from 2014 – ‘Inspired in Hull’, which highlights examples of exciting research from all departments in the Faculty – the new brochure also features PhD students describing the research they are undertaking, and a selection of exciting research news from across the Faculty.

Research in Focus 2016The publication, available online or in print format, has already been shared with other Universities and their students, from as far afield as China and Malaysia.

Professor Stephen Kelly, Dean of the Faculty of Science and Engineering said: “Our 2016 research brochure highlights some of the novel and exciting research being conducted across the Faculty. I am immensely proud of our diverse and collaborative research that is addressing real world problems, from understanding how the Earth is responding to climate change to breakthroughs in ‘bench-to-bedside’ cancer treatments.”

Professor Dan Parsons, Associate Dean for Research and Enterprise, added: “We are committed to conducting excellent, world-leading research that addresses critical challenges in today’s world. Our most recent 2014 Research Excellence Framework results reflect the work of our staff, researchers and research students in pushing the boundaries of science and engineering that is making a difference in the world.”

Research in Focus also includes the latest information about the high quality research environment at the University, and the investment in facilities such as the world-class Brynmor Jones Library and the Allam Building which houses a revamped biomedical research facility with two research centres – one focusing on cardiovascular and metabolic disease and the other on cancer. These are just two of the areas in which the University has an international reputation.

To request free printed copies of the brochure please email science@hull.ac.uk