Using thermal imaging to demonstrate body core and skin temperature change in athletes

Sport science students and researchers have used thermal imaging to support the measurements of body core temperature, skin temperature and blood flow often used in hot, cold and hypoxic research.

The thermal images give a visual demonstration of how the body core and skin temperature with the associated blood flow, changes in response to exercising in hot (31°C 45% relative humidity) and cold (4°C 45% relative humidity) environmental conditions.

The thermal photographs have been taken in a third year module ‘Environmental Physiology’, led by Dr Andrew Garrett and a postgraduate research project he supervises (Effectiveness of short-term heat acclimation on intermittent exercise in hot and thermoneutral environments).

The thermal camera has proved to be a useful teaching tool within the Department of Sport, Health and Exercise Science. The equipment has been on loan to the Department by Professor Dan Parsons (Department of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences).

Thermal images: exercising in hot environmental conditions (31°C 45% relative humidity)

Thermal imaging of exercising in hot environmental conditions (31 degrees C 45% relative humidity) Thermal imaging of exercising in hot environmental conditions (31 degrees C 45% relative humidity) 3AGarrett 2AGarrett 1AGarrett

Thermal images: exercising in cold environmental conditions (4°C 45% relative humidity)

Exercising in cold environmental conditions (4°C 45% relative humidity)

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